Bioloxía



smartgirlsattheparty:

august-mor:

Jane Goodall. National Geographic, 1974.
“You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.” 

We love this Smart Girl!

smartgirlsattheparty:

august-mor:

Jane GoodallNational Geographic, 1974.

“You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.” 

We love this Smart Girl!

(Source: neonjungleworld)

they-call-me-meghan:

Women In Film: an infographic

they-call-me-meghan:

Women In Film: an infographic

fuckgasm:

even my friends aren’t my friends

heythereuniverse:

Clouds Detected on Alien Planet —New Hubble Discovery | TheDailyGalaxy

Weather forecasters on exoplanet GJ 1214b would have an easy job. Today’s forecast: cloudy. Tomorrow: overcast. Extended outlook: more clouds. A team of scientists led by researchers in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago report they have definitively characterized the atmosphere of a super-Earth class planet orbiting another star for the first time.

[Read more]
Source photo 1: [Tyrogthekreeper]
thenewenlightenmentage:

The New Science Behind Picky Eaters
It’s one thing for your brother to hate green vegetables, your beloved to avoid dairy, or your best friend to swear off offerings from the entire country of India. 
But good luck cooking for a guest who turns his nose up at mangoes but not pineapples, picks out tomato slices from a burger, and mercilessly plucks at walnuts studding a brownie. It’s like you need a course in Bayesian statistics to figure out his contradictions.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

The New Science Behind Picky Eaters

It’s one thing for your brother to hate green vegetables, your beloved to avoid dairy, or your best friend to swear off offerings from the entire country of India. 

But good luck cooking for a guest who turns his nose up at mangoes but not pineapples, picks out tomato slices from a burger, and mercilessly plucks at walnuts studding a brownie. It’s like you need a course in Bayesian statistics to figure out his contradictions.

Continue Reading

Someday I will be somewhere else.

heythereuniverse:

Evidence of 3.5-Billion-Year-Old Bacterial Ecosystems Found in Australia | ScienceDaily

Reconstructing the rise of life during the period of Earth’s history when it first evolved is challenging. Earth’s oldest sedimentary rocks are not only rare, but also almost always altered by hydrothermal and tectonic activity. A new study from a team including Carnegie’s Nora Noffke, a visiting investigator, and Robert Hazen revealed the well-preserved remnants of a complex ecosystem in a nearly 3.5 billion-year-old sedimentary rock sequence in Australia.

[Read more]

(Source: FANTASIA)

coolsciencegifs:

GHOST METAL reaction

"In a variation of luminol chemiluminescence, we make a coin appear to glow with ghostly trails.

Get 10mg of luminol and dissolve it in 10mL of 10% ammonia solution, the exact concentration isn’t critical. Then add 1mL of 3% hydrogen peroxide and dilute the whole solution into 100mL of distilled water.

Get a piece of copper metal, a penny will do, and drop it in with the lights out. 

The penny will start to glow as the surface dissolves to form a copper amine complex. The complex catalyzes the reaction of hydrogen peroxide on luminol and causes the solution near the coin to glow. Bright trails can be seen if the copper is moved.

Eventually the concentration of copper in solution rises to the point that all of solution glows and masks the glow near the coin. The reaction will quickly extinguish as the luminol is used up.”

NurdRage source

womenrockscience:

YES Nicki

mediocre-latinist:

radimus-co-uk:

enochliew:

Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs

Not only a portable design, but able to print on any size page.

it finally feels like 2014

*makes squeaking noises in the middle of starbucks*

(Source: Engadget)

(Source: c-aelii)

She is not “my girl.”

She belongs to herself. And I am blessed, for with all her freedom, she still comes back to me, moment-to-moment, day-by-day, and night-by-night.

How much more blessed can I be?

—Avraham Chaim, Thoughts after The Alchemist (via barbieandken)

(Source: avraham-chai)

mindblowingscience:

Four new species of ‘killer sponges’ from the deep sea
This microscope image shows the carcass of a small crustacean (possibly a deep-sea amphipod) that was caught in the spines of one of the newly discovered carnivorous sponges, Cladorhiza evae.

Credit: Henry Reiswig © 2013 MBARI

Killer sponges sound like creatures from a B-grade horror movie. In fact, they thrive in the lightless depths of the deep sea. Scientists first discovered that some sponges are carnivorous about 20 years ago. Since then only seven carnivorous species have been found in all of the northeastern Pacific. A new paper authored by MBARI marine biologist Lonny Lundsten and two Canadian researchers describes four new species of carnivorous sponges living on the deep seafloor, from the Pacific Northwest to Baja California.
A far cry from your basic kitchen sponge, these animals look more like bare twigs or small shrubs covered with tiny hairs. But the hairs consist of tightly packed bundles of microscopic hooks that trap small animals such as shrimp-like amphipods. Once an animal becomes trapped, it takes only a few hours for sponge cells to begin engulfing and digesting it. After several days, all that is left is an empty shell.
MBARI researchers videotaped the new sponges on the seafloor, then collected a few samples for taxonomic work and species-reference collections. Back in the lab, when they looked closely at the collected sponges, the scientists discovered, as Lundsten put it, “numerous crustacean prey in various states of decomposition.”
Sponges are generally filter feeders, living off of bacteria and single-celled organisms sieved from the surrounding water. They contain specialized cells called choancytes, whose whip-like tails move continuously to create a flow of water which brings food to the sponge. However, most carnivorous sponges have no choancytes. As Lundsten explained, “To keep beating the whip-like tails of the choancytes takes a lot of energy. And food is hard to come by in the deep sea. So these sponges trap larger, more nutrient-dense organisms, like crustaceans, using beautiful and intricate microscopic hooks.”

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Four new species of ‘killer sponges’ from the deep sea

This microscope image shows the carcass of a small crustacean (possibly a deep-sea amphipod) that was caught in the spines of one of the newly discovered carnivorous sponges, Cladorhiza evae.

Credit: Henry Reiswig © 2013 MBARI

Killer sponges sound like creatures from a B-grade horror movie. In fact, they thrive in the lightless depths of the deep sea. Scientists first discovered that some sponges are carnivorous about 20 years ago. Since then only seven carnivorous species have been found in all of the northeastern Pacific. A new paper authored by MBARI marine biologist Lonny Lundsten and two Canadian researchers describes four new species of carnivorous sponges living on the deep seafloor, from the Pacific Northwest to Baja California.

A far cry from your basic kitchen sponge, these animals look more like bare twigs or small shrubs covered with tiny hairs. But the hairs consist of tightly packed bundles of microscopic hooks that trap small animals such as shrimp-like amphipods. Once an animal becomes trapped, it takes only a few hours for sponge cells to begin engulfing and digesting it. After several days, all that is left is an empty shell.

MBARI researchers videotaped the new sponges on the seafloor, then collected a few samples for taxonomic work and species-reference collections. Back in the lab, when they looked closely at the collected sponges, the scientists discovered, as Lundsten put it, “numerous crustacean prey in various states of decomposition.”

Sponges are generally filter feeders, living off of bacteria and single-celled organisms sieved from the surrounding water. They contain specialized cells called choancytes, whose whip-like tails move continuously to create a flow of water which brings food to the sponge. However, most carnivorous sponges have no choancytes. As Lundsten explained, “To keep beating the whip-like tails of the choancytes takes a lot of energy. And food is hard to come by in the deep sea. So these sponges trap larger, more nutrient-dense organisms, like crustaceans, using beautiful and intricate microscopic hooks.”

Continue Reading.