Bioloxía



(Source: vmagazine)

(Source: ThisisNicolai)

chescaleigh:

upworthy:

A Really Easy Chart To Help Americans Understand One Particular ‘Fashion’ Statement

Halloween is right around the corner folks…

crotchetybushtit:

yea getting girls to do STEM fields is important but u know what else is important? that we stop devaluing feminized work like elderly and child care, support work, social work, teaching, etc. pls stop acting like STEM fields are the final frontier for women

gaksdesigns:

Geometric watercolor-like tattoos by Russian based artist Sasha Unisex 

aradiator:

i hate when people say that women should dress more modestly in order to “leave something to the imagination”. leave what to the imagination? what do people think is under my clothes? a mass of algae? memes? shinji ikari?

sentientarboroform:

spiritsflame:

If whats happening in Ferguson was happening to an all white community, it would be called a dystopian novel

#and all actions against the police would be heroic and daring#and the plucky white protags would be encouraged to use violence to stop the injustice

bagelluvaaaa:

animals-riding-animals:

butterfly riding lizard

Butterfly riding lizard,That could be a very different picture

bagelluvaaaa:

animals-riding-animals:

butterfly riding lizard

Butterfly riding lizard,That could be a very different picture

mama-panther:

[cries but also keeps eyeliner intact]

scienceyoucanlove:

The Siamese fighting fish, also known as the beta, are known as biting fish in Thai and tend to be rather aggressive. More info: http://tr.im/1NNXf©Visarute Angkatavanich
from I fucking love biodiversity

scienceyoucanlove:

The Siamese fighting fish, also known as the beta, are known as biting fish in Thai and tend to be rather aggressive. 

More info: http://tr.im/1NNXf
©Visarute Angkatavanich

from I fucking love biodiversity

smilestoinspire:

This is the greatest tweet in the history of tweets

smilestoinspire:

This is the greatest tweet in the history of tweets

sixpenceee:

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (Rosetta’s Comet) when compared to the city of Los Angeles (Picture Credit) 

sixpenceee:

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (Rosetta’s Comet) when compared to the city of Los Angeles (Picture Credit) 

s-c-i-guy:

600 Million Years and Counting…

I was pretty bored so I decided to make some GIFs of the last 600 million years of our planet’s plate tectonics.

The first GIF is a global mollewide projection. The second one is of the Colorado Plateau and the North American Southwest. The next GIF is of the entire formation of the North American Continent. The fourth GIF is of geologic and tectonic evolution of Europe. And finally the last one is the same as the first except in rectangular format.

I obtained the images from Global Paleogeography and them compiled them one by one into Photoshop with the end result being the above GIFs.

Geology rocks

(Source: itslatingirl)

earthstory:

Waw an NamusOften said to be the eighth wonder of the world and almost situated at the centre of the Sahara Desert in Libya, lies a cauldron like volcano known as Waw an Namus. The area is often described as one of the most remote places on earth, and yet is quite a popular attraction amongst tourists. Waw an Namus is approximately 4 km wide with a 100 metre deep caldera and appears in Google Earth as a dark eye in the middle of the great sand sea, as there is a large deposit of black ash approximately 10-20km wide. The name Waw an Namus means Oasis of mosquitoes and if you are lucky enough to visit this remote beautiful landscape the name would be well suited. The surrounding small lakes are infested with mosquitoes, to an extent that they form a haze above the lakes.Inside the cauldron, known as the caldera, at its base are three small salty lakes, where one is quite warm.No lava flows from this crater at the moment, but there are small rocks ejected from the central cone, some of which are feldspatic basalts, dunite, and green olivine, which suggests that the magma that formed in the volcano rose fast from deep in the mantle (1).
This Dark Eye in the middle of the desert is easily viewed from space and is a hub for tourists, whom camp at the top of the volcano away from the mosquitoes at the surrounding lakes or in a nearby camping ground.Waw an Namus stands 547 metres high and is located south east of Sabha, in the southern Fezzan region of Libya.-NBReferencehttp://volcano.oregonstate.edu/vwdocs/volc_images/africa/waw_an_namus.htmlFurther Readinghttp://www.temehu.com/Cities_sites/wawnamos.htmhttp://www.ewpnet.com/libya/namus.htmhttp://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0205-008Photograph Courtesy of National Geographic Espana http://www.nationalgeographic.com.es/2009/09/27/sahara1.html

earthstory:

Waw an Namus

Often said to be the eighth wonder of the world and almost situated at the centre of the Sahara Desert in Libya, lies a cauldron like volcano known as Waw an Namus. The area is often described as one of the most remote places on earth, and yet is quite a popular attraction amongst tourists. 

Waw an Namus is approximately 4 km wide with a 100 metre deep caldera and appears in Google Earth as a dark eye in the middle of the great sand sea, as there is a large deposit of black ash approximately 10-20km wide. The name Waw an Namus means Oasis of mosquitoes and if you are lucky enough to visit this remote beautiful landscape the name would be well suited. The surrounding small lakes are infested with mosquitoes, to an extent that they form a haze above the lakes.Inside the cauldron, known as the caldera, at its base are three small salty lakes, where one is quite warm.

No lava flows from this crater at the moment, but there are small rocks ejected from the central cone, some of which are feldspatic basalts, dunite, and green olivine, which suggests that the magma that formed in the volcano rose fast from deep in the mantle (1).


This Dark Eye in the middle of the desert is easily viewed from space and is a hub for tourists, whom camp at the top of the volcano away from the mosquitoes at the surrounding lakes or in a nearby camping ground.
Waw an Namus stands 547 metres high and is located south east of Sabha, in the southern Fezzan region of Libya.

-NB

Reference
http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/vwdocs/volc_images/africa/waw_an_namus.html
Further Reading
http://www.temehu.com/Cities_sites/wawnamos.htm
http://www.ewpnet.com/libya/namus.htm
http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0205-008
Photograph Courtesy of National Geographic Espana http://www.nationalgeographic.com.es/2009/09/27/sahara1.html